History of the Evil Eye

Born in primitive communities and still thriving within today’s high technology societies. Equally welcomed by wearers from different religious, cultural, social and economic backgrounds, the amulet is believed to guard any wearer against any evil associated with envious or covetous eyes. Human beings living in Turkey, Japan, America, or in any part of the world are afraid in similar ways of similar things. “Stroke by an evil eye/Touch of an evil eye” is just one of such superstitions. Belief in the evil eye is also popular in many countries in the Mediterranean region although people in other quarters of the world wear evil eye charms and amulets as a precaution guarding against “evil thinking.” Literally, “nazar” (Originally Arabic word means sight or glances or eye in English). It is also used as “strike of evil eye” and refers to a special meaning. The respective entry in the dictionary of Idioms describes it as follows: Being struck negatively by enthusiastic or jealous looks of others which are believed to do evil or bring bad luck. Belief in the evil eye is ancient and ubiquitous: it occurred in ancient Greece and Rome; is found in Jewish, Islamic, Buddhist, and Hindu traditions and in folk cultures and preliterate societies. In some societies, like the Turkish society, blue eyed people are believed to bring bad luck. These beliefs gave way to the birth of many amulets and charms as well as blue-colored evil eye beads. “Evil eye” was the name for eye pictures, eye shaped beans or any other charms providing protection against the strike of evil eye. It was in the sixth century BC that ancient Greeks manufactured black-figure wine drinking vessels (literally known as “eye vessels”) with exaggerated eye figures on them, which were believed to prevent evil spirits from entering the drinker’s body while drinking wine. In short, evil eye might be defined as an object which is supposed to have magical power to ward off danger and bring good luck.

The use of amulets was inherited by the Christian church. Amulets became common among the early Christians that in the fourth century the clergy were forbidden to make or sell them on pain of deprivation of holy orders. In 721. The wearing of amulets was solemnly condemned by the church. However, amulets never lost popularity until today. Our ancestors used amulet and charms for centuries to break the spells cast upon them. Currently we are in the technological age but we failed to give up our habits. Nazar bonjuk is just one of them. Modern people still wear nazar bonjuk or use it as the most common article in houses or cars. We still squeeze into the protective track of nazar bonjuk which is highly familiar to most of us with its vivid and blue color. There are many possibilities and ways one can use blue beads. They are put on babies when they are born, used as accessories at homes, used in necklaces, pendants, bracelets or key rings. The only rule is that the beads are always with you, or in a visible position. Our website consists of all the different kinds of beads and evil eyes. There are many different items from rosaries to key rings. Please visit our website and for further details get in contact with us.According to a Turkish belief, an envious look cast upon you may bring bad luck. A tradition that defines evil always provides a charm for protection. We believe the eye looks out for us, protects us from the evil eye and bring good luck. We hope it brings good luck to you as well. The blue beads are made out of glass, plastic, ceramic are believed to protect the person or the object that carries them. They take the negative energy, the envious look to themselves and protect the person from the evils.

Contact

La Nazar – USA
Sherman Oaks, CA 91423

Phone : (818) 439 8553
Email: losangelesnazar@gmail.com